Medicine of the Future in America

Urinary Fibrinopeptide A in Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism (1)

Urinary Fibrinopeptide A in Evaluation of Patients with Suspected Acute Pulmonary Embolism (1)Acute pulmonary embolism (PE) is a common and L serious (30 percent mortality if untreated) illness that, unfortunately, has a notoriously nonspecific symptomatology. Therefore, diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected PE frequently requires performance of specialized tests: ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scans and pulmonary angiography (PA). These procedures involve radiation exposure and are timeconsuming, uncomfortable, expensive, and, in the case of angiography, invasive. After objective testing, 21 to 56 percent of suspected patients will be found to have PE. Hence, there is still a great need for a simple laboratory test with a high sensitivity for PE, so that patients with a negative result can be spared further cumbersome testing.
Fibrinopeptide A (FPA) is a 16-amino-acid peptide that is cleaved from fibrinogen by thrombin during fibrin clot formation. Plasma fibrinopeptide A (pFPA) is a useful screening test; it reliably excludes PE when the test is negative. However, clinical utilization of this test has been hampered by a tedious sample collection technique and inconvenient assay. Recently, a urinary fibrinopeptide A (uFPA) assay performed on a random urine sample by a radioimmunoassay has been demonstrated to have close correlation with pFPA. antibiotic levaquin
This prospective pilot study assessed the uFPA concentration and a combination of uFPA with V/Q scans in a diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected PE.

This entry was posted in Pulmonary function and tagged acute pulmonary embolism, chest roe, fibrin.
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