Medicine of the Future in America

Respiratory Illness in Nonsmokers Chronically Exposed to Tobacco Smoke in the Work Place (9)

Respiratory Illness in Nonsmokers Chronically Exposed to Tobacco Smoke in the Work Place (9)Respiratory Symptoms
Passive smokers reported more respiratory symptoms than nonsmokers. Specifically, passive smokers were significantly (p<0.001) more likely than nonsmokers to report chronic cough symptoms, chronic phlegm symptoms, shortness of breath and chest illnesses (Table 2). buy cipro
Discussion
Several methods were used to minimize bias in this study. First, CO levels were measured to assess whether the self-reported passive smokers actually experienced more smoke at the work place than nonsmokers. Measures on the paired subjects were gathered on the same day or on consecutive days to eliminate diurnal or seasonal variations.
Second, candidates who were ex-smokers, who had ever lived in a home where smoking was permitted or who had health, environmental or occupational conditions that could affect pulmonary function adversely were not included in the study.
Third, all tests and evaluations were administered identically to all subjects by the same technician. The technician did not disclose the study hypothesis.

Table 2—Proportions and Significance of Differences between Passive Smokers and Nonsmokers Who Experienced Chronic Respiratory Symptoms

Symptoms PassiveSmokers(%) Nonsmokers(%) p Valuef
Cough 70 25 0.0003
Phlegm 67.5 20 0.0002
Breathlessness 67.5 15 0.0001
Colds 85 20 0.0001
This entry was posted in Pulmonary function and tagged respiratory illness, respiratory symptoms, tobacco smoke.
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