Medicine of the Future in America

Respiratory Illness in Nonsmokers Chronically Exposed to Tobacco Smoke in the Work Place (1)

Respiratory Illness in Nonsmokers Chronically Exposed to Tobacco Smoke in the Work Place (1)There is concern regarding the health consequences for men and women exposed to tobacco smoke in the work place. The involuntary inhalation of tobacco smoke is termed “passive smoking.” Smoke exposure is produced from the burning cigarette and from that exhaled by the smoker. birth control yasmin
During active smoking the level of tobacco smoke collecting in the lungs is high compared to that found in the lungs of passive smokers. Various respiratory irritants in tobacco smoke are thought to be part of the reason that active smokers experience more chest colds, eye irritation and respiratory illness than non-smokers.

The present study asks the question: does exposure to tobacco smoke in the work place, as measured by CO levels, produce respiratory and eye symptomatology, and cause respiratory illness and chest colds in passive smokers? The authors found no adult studies that investigated the effects of environmental tobacco smoke exposure on the prevalence and symptoms of respiratory illness. The concentration of inhalable particulate matter in work areas where smoking is permitted has been recorded to be 1.5 to 25 times higher than in nonsmoking areas. Since any amount of smoke exposure will result in elevated levels of suspended, respirable, particulate matter, and the cumulative effect of exposure will vary among individuals, the purpose of this study was to determine if tobacco smoke exposure in the work place put coworkers at greater risk of developing respiratory symptoms, eye irritation and chest colds than nonexposed coworkers.

This entry was posted in Pulmonary function and tagged respiratory illness, respiratory symptoms, tobacco smoke.
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